Livia Drusilla

Rise to Power Early Life Livia Drusilla was born in either 59 or 58 BCE.[1]  Her mother, Alfidia, was from a wealthy, if not aristocratic family.[2]  Livia’s father, however, Marcus Livius Drusus Claudianus, had ties to two important aristocratic families: he was a member of the Claudian family by birth and the Livian family by … More Livia Drusilla

Ancient Roman Prostitues

  Who: Female Prostitutes What: Prostitution in Ancient Rome Where: Mostly Pompeii, but prostitution was everywhere When: primarily between 200 BCE and 250 CE Why: Though many high school history books may hide the knowledge of ancient prostitutes, that does not mean they do not exist. Prostitution has been around for a very long time, often referred … More Ancient Roman Prostitues

Midwives

The average married woman in antiquity was likely to have an average of four to six children, and with high infant mortality rates, ancient midwives would have done invaluable work. … More Midwives

Conceptual Virginity & Homosexual Themes From Antiquity

Abstract      The research I conducted for this project focused on the concept of ancient virginity, specifically centred around Greece and Rome. I researched both the ancient physical understandings of the notion of virginity and how this applied differently to males and females. From my original research, I began to notice an interesting trend that revealed more information about homosexuality and homosexual relationships as being ‘exempt’ from … More Conceptual Virginity & Homosexual Themes From Antiquity

Prescribed Implications of Dress: Comparing the Matrona and the Mistress in the Early Roman Empire

I was interested in discovering what made clothing important to the Romans. What aspects were unique to women? After some initial research, I decided to focus on two seemingly opposite classes of women, feeding into the Madonna and Whore trope, I decided to investigate differences in dress of matronas and prostitutes in Roman society. However, … More Prescribed Implications of Dress: Comparing the Matrona and the Mistress in the Early Roman Empire